Feds Immune from Federal Employees’ Group Life Insurance Act (FEGLIA) Lawsuit for Loss of Beneficiary Designations

In Graber v. Metropolitan Life Insurance Company, a lawsuit against the United States and Metropolitan Life Insurance Company to obtain the life insurance benefits of a deceased federal employee, a U.S. District Court in Ohio ruled yesterday that the federal government has sovereign immunity for the improper maintenance of life insurance beneficiary designation forms.  The dispute arose when Metropolitan Life Insurance Company denied a life insurance claim filed by the insured’s surviving spouse and subsequently issued payment of the benefits to the insured’s brother.  Met Life based its decision on the insured’s incomplete personnel file, which contained a form designating the brother as sole beneficiary in 1996 but lacked any record of the insured’s request in 2008 to change the beneficiary to her husband.

Under the Federal Employees’ Group Life Insurance Act, the United States has waived sovereign immunity for any “breach of legal duty owed.”  Although the federal government was responsible for maintaining the insured’s personnel file, the District Court’s holding that no duty exists to properly maintain FEGLI records precludes recovery, as the federal government has not unequivocally consented to be sued for the loss, misfiling, or misplacing of beneficiary designation forms.

Sound like a bunch of nonsensical legal mumbo jumbo?  Well, that’s debatable… even federal courts are somewhat split on the issue.  Prior to the Graber decision, the Fifth Circuit concluded in Metropolitan Life v. Atkins that the federal government does have the duty to properly maintain beneficiary designation forms in the care of its FEGLI personnel clerks.  Yet, other federal courts limit the United States’ duty under the Act to only negotiating and issuing the correct FEGLI life insurance policy.

The lesson to be taken away from this discussion is two-fold.  First, if you are a federal employee with group life insurance benefits, follow-up on any beneficiary designations to ensure that your personnel file accurately reflects your intentions.  And most importantly, always consult with a life insurance lawyer about your denied life insurance claim or beneficiary dispute.  Until the Supreme Court picks a side, every “designated” beneficiary deserves to make their case.

The full court opinions referenced in this post can be found here —–> Graber v. Metropolitan Life ; Metropolitan Life v. Atkins .

For additional information on how a life insurance lawyer can help you, visit www.life-insurancelawyer.com and www.life-insurance-law-firm.com or Contact Us at (800)403-5710 to speak with an attorney about your case now.

Interim Coverage Granted For Insured Who Died Prior To Policy’s Effective Date

If an insured passes away prior to a life insurance policy’s effective date but after the first premium payment, the insurance company will likely deny the beneficiary’s life insurance claim.  This makes sense to many of us, and to many state legislators, as the application for life insurance must generally be approved before an insurance company accepts the insurance risk.

In some states, though, temporary or interim coverage is recognized when insurance companies collect premiums on the application date but fail to clearly explain the delay in life insurance coverage.  In Pennsylvania, Heather D. Lee, Esquire recently won an administrative appeal after a major life insurance company denied a claim based on the alleged “inactive” status of a policy.  The insured, who suffered an unexpected heart attack less than one week before the policy’s “effective date,” was never properly notified of any delay in coverage even though the life insurance company eagerly accepted the first premium payment.  With the assistance of an experienced life insurance lawyer, the insured’s policy was reinstated and the claim properly reviewed and paid.

Under these circumstances, an insurance company is still entitled to conduct a standard review of the application upon reinstatement because the insured’s death will have occurred within two (2) years of the policy’s effective date.  For more information on how a life insurance attorney can help you with a similar or other life insurance denial, visit www.life-insurancelawyer.com and www.life-insurance-law-firm.com, or Contact Us at (800)403-5710 for a free claim evaluation.